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1018 brown squashy kangaroo leather barmah hat
Barmah Hat | 1018 Squashy Kangaroo Crackle Brown £64.95
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1025 Barmah Hat Suede Leather
Barmah Hat | 1025 Suede Hickory £49.95
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barmah hat canvas foldaway beige
Barmah Hat | 1057 Foldaway Cooler Beige Canvas £32.95
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black barmah hat, Australian leather hat
Barmah Hat | 1060 Bronco Black £49.95
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Redback Boots | Original Brown UBOK
Redback Boots | Original Brown UBOK from £99.95
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Redback Boots | Original Crazy Horse UBCH
Redback Boots | Original Crazy Horse UBCH from £99.95
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Redback Boots | Soft Toe UNPU
Redback Boots | Soft Toe UNPU £104.95
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Redback safety boots brown USBOK
Redback Safety Boots | Brown USBOK from £99.95
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StrikeFire Fire Starter - Large
StrikeFire Fire Starter - Large £10.95
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StrikeFire British FireSteel Ferrocerium Road
StrikeFire Fire Starter - Medium £7.95
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Strikefire Spork Stainless Steel Knife Fork Spoon
StrikeFire Spork - Stainless £7.95
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Titanium Spork Strike Fire Knife Spoon
StrikeFire Spork - Titanium £10.95
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Zebra Head loop handle pot 10cm
Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 10cm £16.95
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Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 12cm
Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 12cm £19.95
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Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 14cm
Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 14cm £21.95
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Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 16cm
Zebra Loop Handle Pot Auto Lock 16cm £25.95
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Bushgear.co.uk is a valuable resource for the adventurer, the explorer, the outdoor and bushcraft enthusiast in many of us - we supply high-performance outdoor clothing and equipment at reasonable prices.

We are committed to finding high quality outdoor gear – not necessarily an easy task these days – so we don’t go straight for the cheap, often Chinese-made, option. Outdoor shops and mail order catalogues are full of cheaply-made equipment that has not been properly tried and tested. We believe that those who have had equipment fail to perform when needed understand the benefit of high quality gear that has been specifically designed for extended outdoor use.

If you have any question, contact Bushgear Outdoors on 01795 534343.

Bush Telegraph 2017

The "Explorer" Gene - Is adventure in your blood?

March 22, 2017

Having recently gone to a talk hosted by ex-para and expedition guide, Levison Wood, we felt inspired to look into the mechanisms that drive us to discover, innovate and explore. According to the latest genetic and sociological research, the human drive to "get out there" may well be driven by our DNA, as well as by necessity, evolution and logic.  Speaking roughly, there are currently three main theories, which help us understand the human proclivity for travel and exploration. The first is based in genetics, the second is based in the development of the human anatomy and the third is an amalgamation of the first two. Let's look at the genetic argument first. Researchers have isolated a gene called DRD4...

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The Best Survival Tools - Our Top 5

March 21, 2017

This had been a very long running debate in the world of bush craft and survival. Many would agree, that a knife is of primary importance, but beyond that, there is little consensus as to what needs to be carried. Naturally, this will be a case of each to his/her own. We believe however, that there are five items that are of absolute, paramount importance to wilderness living/survival. In other words, we believe these items to be practically indispensable. 1) Knife - The oldest and probably the most useful tool a man can own. Can be used for hunting, fire making, fishing, tool making, building traps, building shelter, clothes making and so much more. 2) Water vessel and baskets -...

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Wild Edible Of The Week - Week 6 "Sweet Violet"

March 21, 2017

Wild Edible Of The Week - Week 6 - "Sweet Violet" Botanical name : Viola odorata Common name : Sweet Violet Physical appearance : A low growing downy creeper with rounded green leaves and violet, white or blue flowers. Edible parts : Flowers, leaves and stems. Best places to find : Gardens, scrub land, hedgerows, woodland edges. Time of year : Best harvested between March and May. Serving suggestions : Works best as a flavouring for various food stuffs including sponge cakes, rice puddings and wild game. Other uses : Flowers can be dipped in egg whites then dipped in granulated sugar. Once dry, they can be added to salads, puddings and main courses to add interest. NB - Please...

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Wild Edible Of The Week - Week 7 - "Jack By The Hedge"

March 20, 2017

Botanical name : Alliaria petiolata Common names : Jack By The Hedge, Garlic Mustard, Poor Man's Mustard, Sauce Alone, Jack In The Bush Physical appearance : An annual or biennial, growing to just under a metre in height. The leaves are slightly toothed and usually vibrant green. The flowers are white and small. Edible parts : Leaves. Best places to find : Sides of roads and paths, hedgerows, woodland edges, open woodlands. Time of year : Best harvested between September and October. Being a biennial, if there has been a mild Winter, it may also sprout in February/March. Serving suggestions : Traditional use in the UK - the leaves are made into a sauce which works as an ideal accompaniment...

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The Importance of Fire in Wilderness Living

March 20, 2017

If you have ever watched any television shows about bush craft or survival, you probably have noticed that all the participants seem to be obsessed with collecting fire wood and lighting fires.This is not a random coincidence! Fire is without doubt, the most useful survival tool to the outdoor adventurer. More than a knife, sleeping bag, tent or torch a fire can keep you alive in many ways. So let's start with the obvious - fire for warmth. If you are living in any type of wilderness shelter, you will need to keep yourself warm. Hypothermia (severe cooling of the body) can be an issue, even when the ambient temperature is relatively high. Being wet or having damp clothing can...

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How to Cook on Fire - Me Caveman!

March 13, 2017

Since the dawn of time, man has been using open fire to cook and prepare food for consumption. Cooking food was a distinctive leap in the evolutionary progress of man, and in fact, was one of the first scientific advancements of mankind. Through the process of cooking, parasites, viruses and bacteria are denatured and rendered harmless to the human body. Cooking certain foods, releases energy from within the food, making it digestible and therefore available to the human body (e.g. potatoes). Cooking and smoking food can greatly increase its shelf life (lifespan). As you can imagine, as there are many techniques for lighting a fire, there are also many differing techniques for cooking with flame. These techniques vary from the...

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Wild Edible Of The Week - Week 5 - "Hops"

March 08, 2017

Botanical name : Humulus Lupulus Common name : Hop / Hops Physical appearance : A large climbing plant which can grow up to 6 metres in height. The leaves are toothed and have five lobes. The female flowers grow in rounded clusters (what we commonly think of as hops). Edible parts : Very young leaves and stems. Best places to find : Wasteland, scrub land, hedgerows, woodland edges. Time of year : Best harvested between July and August, for beer making. For eating, the young shoots and leaves should be harvested no later than May. Serving suggestions : The young shoots and leaves can be cooked and prepared in the same way as store bought asparagus. Can also be used...

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Wild Edible Of The Week - Week 4 -"Nettle"

February 27, 2017

Botanical name : Urtica Dioica Common name : Stinging Nettle   Physical appearance : A medium sized perennial with large, toothed, heart shaped leaves. The plant is an upright perennial which is covered with fine stinging hairs, with thin catkins of green flowers. Edible parts : Leaves and stems. The younger shoots are the tastiest. The older leaves and stems take on a distinctly woody and gritty texture combined with a bitter flavour. Older leaves can also have a mildly laxative effect. Best places to find : Roadsides, cultivated ground, hedgerows, woodlands, waste ground and river valleys. Time of year : The leaves and stems can be picked from February to May or even a little later. As mentioned above,...

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What is an EDC Kit and How To Build One?

February 27, 2017

Over the last 10 years or so, there has been a continually increasing trend for people to carry essential tools and equipment with them, on a daily basis. If you have not already guessed, EDC stands for every day carry. These items are typically carried in a pocket, in a belt (or other) pouch, in a wallet, in a rucksack or other bag. Why carry an EDC kit? There are basically two types of EDC kit that people carry. In a post 9/11 climate, the tendency has been towards survival kit style EDCs, comprising of a multitude of useful items, mainly geared towards survival in urban environments. The other type of EDC, mainly referred to as a pocket EDC, usually...

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Wild Edible Of The Week - Week 3 - "Good King Henry"

February 22, 2017

Botanical name : Chenopodium Bonus-Henricus Common name : Good King Henry   Physical appearance : A medium sized perennial with large, finely toothed, triangular leaves. Edible parts : Leaves and stems. Best places to find : Roadsides, cultivated ground Time of year : The leaves and stems can be picked all year round. The stems may become "woody" in texture, later on in the season. Serving suggestions : The leaves and stems can be prepared like spinach or asparagus - boiled quickly until tender then served with salt and melted butter. The leaves make a flavourful addition to salads. NB - Please be sure you know what you are picking. Many plants look similar to one another and many can...

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